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CCRF Celebrates World Spine Day With First Request for Tender

New Funding Pathway for Canadian-Based MSK Research

In honour of World Spine Day, the Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation (CCRF) has announced its first Request for Tender (RFT). Through this RFT, research teams from Canada and around the world are invited to submit proposals to conduct an exhaustive systematic review of literature to ascertain if there is an association between cervical spinal manipulation and ischemic stroke. If it is determined such an association exists, this study will determine whether the evidence supports a causal association.

“RFTs enable us to ask the critical questions that will protect and benefit our patients, integrate MSK experts into the broader healthcare landscape and grow chiropractic,” says CCRF chair, Dr. Nadine Ellul.  “They enable us to comprehensively examine past and present research, identify gaps in that research, determine the best ways to fill those gaps and allocate funding to where it will do the greatest amount of good.”

“Our semi-annual requests for proposals have surpassed our expectation, enabling CCRF to curate and fund best ideas from the Canadian research community,” says Dr. McIlmoyle, CCRF’s Research Committee chair. “This new Request for Tender provides us with a new way to fuel research by allowing CCRF and its stakeholders to drill down on specific questions and invite research teams to bid on them. It also opens collaborative opportunities with interprofessional research teams – here in Canada and around the world.”

Grants, including those offered through Requests for Tenders, for are made possible through the generous support of private donors, corporate partners, the Canadian Chiropractic Association (CCA) and Provincial Associates, representing clinicians from across the country. Their commitment to evidence-based national research is greatly appreciated.

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